Search results for: off-white-readings-on-power-privilege-and-resistance

Off White

Author : Michelle Fine
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With a fascinating new introduction on the proliferation and development of the field of whiteness studies and updated essays throughout, this much-anticipated second ddition continues to redefine our understanding of race and society. Also inlcludes three maps.

Off White

Author : Michelle Fine
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In 1997, 'Off White' first presented an analysis of the white racialization process. In this new edition the focus is upon the material conditions of whiteness as a privilege, & the turns of whiteness produced when individuals & collectives take up a challenge to contemporary racial formations.

Taboo

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Taboo

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File Size : 69.28 MB
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Class Construction

Author : Carrie Freie
File Size : 22.38 MB
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Class Construction explores class, racial, and gender identity construction among white, working-class students. Delving into River City High School, Freie asks what happens to the adolescent children of working-class families when economic changes such as globalization and technological advancements have altered the face of working-class jobs. Mass consumerism, greater availability of college level education, lack of a cohesive class identity, and racial and religious politics all combine to create a new working-class identity for today's youth. Featuring interviews with the River City High School students, Class Construction aims to understand how class is conceptualized among American, working-class youths. Class Construction is ideal for courses on sociology, education, gender studies, and American studies, as well as high school educators and administrators.

Racial Battle Fatigue Insights from the Front Lines of Social Justice Advocacy

Author : Jennifer L. Martin
File Size : 51.40 MB
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Covering equity issues of sex, race, class, age, sexual orientation, and disability, this work presents creative, nontraditional narratives about performing social justice work, acknowledging the contributions of previous generations, describing current challenges, and appealing to readers to join the struggle toward a better world. • Details personal stories of the struggles of social justice advocacy work in the field and in the academy • Addresses the myth of post-racial America and realities of ongoing white supremacy • Explains the challenges and methods of teaching about racism in the current media and popular culture • Presents a diverse group of authors detailing disparate perspectives and experiences • Advises students, novice scholars, and practitioners interested in engaging in social justice work

Does Your Vote Count

Author : Paul R. Carr
File Size : 68.38 MB
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The public debate on democracy is often constrained within an alienating and disenfranchising narrative of opinion polls, campaign platforms, personalities and formal structures that generate legislation, all of which surreptitiously seems to trickle down to the classroom. Paul R. Carr asserts that democracy must be cultivated in a vigorous, conscientious, meaningful and critical way in and through education in order for it to have salience in society, especially within a neoliberal conjuncture that promotes limited space for epistemological interrogation of how we understand and are engaged in maintaining and/or transforming our societies. Building on the critical pedagogical work of Paulo Freire, Joe L. Kincheloe, and others, this book develops a framework for understanding how a thicker democratic education can be conceptualized and implemented in schools. The book aims to move the focus on democracy away from voting, and place it more properly on the importance of social justice and political literacy as a way of understanding what democracy is and, importantly, how to make it more relevant for all of society. The book concludes that another democracy is possible, as well as being desirable, and that education is the fundamental intersection in which it must be devloped. "Paul R. Carr has produced a rich and impressive examination of the multiplicity of relationships among notions of democratic formation, critical pedagogy, human rights, anti-racism, and feminist, anti-colonial, political and cultural studies. Drawing from a deep well of intriguing and eclectic sources..., he moves with clarity and elan between the brood and the narrow, the general and the specific to capture the power of theory without sacrificing the nitty-gritty of concrete practice. A balance of possibilities rather than false dualisms will be found here. Does Your Vote Count? has become an essential contribution to my own work and teaching." ---Tom Wilson, Chapman University

Revolutionizing Education

Author : Julio Cammarota
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Many scholars have turned to the groundbreaking critical research methodology, Youth-Led Participatory Action Research (YPAR), as a way to address both the political challenges and inherent power imbalances of conducting research with young people. Revolutionizing Education makes an extraordinarily unique contribution to the literature on adolescents by offering a broad framework for understanding this research methodology. With an informative combination of theory and practice, this edited collection brings together student writings alongside those of major scholars in the field. While remaining sensitive to the methodological challenges of qualitative inquiry, Revolutionizing Education is the first definitive statement of YPAR as it relates to sites of education.

Whiteness and Teacher Education

Author : Edie White
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Due to the rise of internet use and a move toward globalization, it may be assumed that white millennial college students are more accepting of cultural diversity and are more likely to be advocates for social justice than generations that have come before them. This project shows that while many white students know how to speak the language of "correctness" and to some degree even believe in what they are saying, their limited personal experiences with those who are racially different from themselves often bump against their beliefs about racial acceptance and equality. This project investigates the ways that one facet of identity, whiteness, influences teachers’ understanding of their roles in the schools and informs their decision making within their practice. It explores several life stories of five teacher candidates, all born after 1985. Through these stories we get a sense of how white prospective teachers imagine themselves as teachers of diverse students and how they imagine developing equitable practices. This work advocates that teacher educators help pre-service teachers unpack and understand their biases in order to facilitate their students in balancing their life experiences with whom they imagine themselves to be as teachers.

From Workshop to Waste Magnet

Author : Diane Sicotte
File Size : 38.22 MB
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Like many industrialized regions, the Philadelphia metro area contains pockets of environmental degradation: neighborhoods littered with abandoned waste sites, polluting factories, and smoke-belching incinerators. However, other neighborhoods within and around the city are relatively pristine. This eye-opening book reveals that such environmental inequalities did not occur by chance, but were instead the result of specific policy decisions that served to exacerbate endemic classism and racism. From Workshop to Waste Magnet presents Philadelphia’s environmental history as a bracing case study in mismanagement and injustice. Sociologist Diane Sicotte digs deep into the city’s past as a titan of American manufacturing to trace how only a few communities came to host nearly all of the area’s polluting and waste disposal land uses. By examining the complex interactions among economic decline, federal regulations, local politics, and shifting ethnic demographics, she not only dissects what went wrong in Philadelphia but also identifies lessons for environmental justice activism today. Sicotte’s research tallies both the environmental and social costs of industrial pollution, exposing the devastation that occurs when mass quantities of society’s wastes mix with toxic levels of systemic racism and economic inequality. From Workshop to Waste Magnet is a compelling read for anyone concerned with the health of America’s cities and the people who live in them.